Is Bleach A Healthy Use For Mold Removal?

 Is Bleach A Healthy Use For Mold Removal?

 

Can you kill mold with bleach?

Do NOT use Chlorine bleach to kill mold or disinfect moldy areas. It is not an effective or long lasting killer of mold and mold spores. Bleach is good only for changing th mold removal e color of the mold and watering the roots of the mold. CHLORINE BLEACH IS INEFFECTIVE IN KILLING MOLD FOR THESE REASONS:

(1) The object to killing mold is to kill its “roots”. Mold remediation involves the need to disinfect wood and wood-based building materials, all of which are porous materials. Thus, chlorine bleach should not be used in the mold removal process. The use of bleach as a mold disinfectant is best left to kitchen and bathroom counter-tops, tubs and shower glass, etc.

(2) Chlorine Bleach does kill bacteria and viruses, but has not been proven effective in killing molds on surfaces that are not porous. 99% of a bottle of bleach is water. Water is one of the critical elements necessary for the growth of harmful bacteria and mold. Current situations where bleach was used in an attempt to kill mold, it re-grew and regenerated mold and bacteria twice the CFU counts than were originally found before bleaching, within a short period of time. Like an old wives tale, we’ve been led to believe that using bleach will kill some bacteria and mold. It’s what we learned from our parents and have carried on this misconception for years. The strains now associated within Indoor Air quality issues are resistant to the methods our grandmothers employed to clean-up mold.

(3) What potential mold “killing” power chlorine bleach might have is diminished significantly as the bleach sits in warehouses, on grocery store shelves or inside your home or business. Bleach losses 50% of its killing power in just the first 90 days inside a never opened jug or container. Ultra violet light breaks down the Chlorine which is constantly escaping through the plastic walls of its containers.

 

 

Leave a Comment